Paris Champs-Élysées

Paris has its Philharmonie at last

Installed in the quarter of La Villette since January 2015, the Philharmonie de Paris includes the new building built by Jean Nouvel (Philharmonie 1) and the City of Music created byChristian de Portzamparc in 1995. With its numerous spaces and halls, its resident or associated ensembles and orchestras and an innovative artistic project, it constitutes a unique cultural compound displaying music in all its forms to various types of audiences. With its three concert halls of 2,400, 900 and 250 seats, the establishment is also a perfect tool for the national and international symphonic orchestras, who so far failed to find in Paris the great music equipment available in other capitals. Besides the classical repertoire, the Philharmonie is open to modern musical forms, world music and dance. It also inherits the 20-year experience of the City of Music in terms of tuition in all the fields of music. The setting of the Philharmonie in the fast changing East End of Paris is also a will to offer music to a different public.

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La grande salle de la Philharmonie de Paris © Bastien M
Traditional finish for the Tour de France
42nd finish on the Champs-Élysées
Capital of France
Commune-department and prefecture (75)
2,240,000 inhabitants (Parisiens)

Economy: New technology, research, fashion, luxury goods, tourism (the most visited city in the world, with about 30 million tourists each year)

Culture: 31 monuments (Eiffel Tower, Arc de Triomphe, Notre-Dame Cathedral, Sacré-Coeur, Invalides, Panthéon...), 173 museums (Louvre, Grand and Petit Palais, Pompidou Centre, Orsay, Quai Branly...), three operas, 208 theatres and cabarets, 430 cinema screens. Events: Fashion Week, Solidays (three days of concerts against AIDS), Nuit Blanche (allnight arts' festival), Festival d'Automne (visual and performing arts...)

Sport: Paris Saint-Germain (football, Ligue 1 and women's team), Paris-Levallois (basketball, Pro A), Paris Saint-Germain (handball, Division 1), Stade Français Paris (rugby, Top 14). Events: Paris Marathon and Half-marathon, Internationaux de France de tennis (Roland-Garros Grand Slam tournament), judo (Paris Tournament)

Specialities: French gastronomy, plus de 13,500 brasseries and restaurants

Sustainable development: More than 600km of cycling paths, Vélib' bike hire, Autolib' car hire, tram, metro, railway

Distinction: The backs of the Seine are a UNESCO World Heritage Site

Slogan: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Tossed but not sunk)

Long live Parisian cycling

The Tour de France history always relished “regionals”, the local riders eager to shine when they arrive on home ground to kiss friends and relatives on the side of the road. A region is however regularly overlooked, or rather a town, Paris! Still Parisian cycling compares favourably with other more famous bike-mad regions like Brittany or the North and the French capital gave cycling some of its most famous names. 1905 Tour champion Louis Trousselier, for one, was a true Parisian from the suburb of Levallois, in which was founded the famous VCL club. VCL was managed but the stern Paul Ruinart, who coached the great riders of the 1930s like Andre Leducq or Georges Speicher. Paris is known for its rebellious penchant and it was especially reflected by the popular Pelissier brothers, the favourite enemies of Tour founder Henri Desgrange, by Honoré Barthelemy and his glass eye or by the misfortunes of Eugene Christophe. Post-War Paris saw the rise of a gang of fun loving bons vivants around Louis Caput, Robert Chapatte or the “postman” Andre Le Dissez. They loved their bikes, their meals, their drinks and their jokes and befriended some of the wittiest cycling fans of French literature of the time, Michel Audiard and Antoine Blondin. The next generation struggled to rise to their level even if Laurent Fignon was far from soft-spoken.

Le cycliste Louis Trousselier, originaire d’Ile-de-France © Presse SportsHonoré Barthélémy en action © Presse SportsLes frères parisiens Henri et Francis Pelissier © Presse SportsLaurent Fignon, né en 1960 à Paris, faisait partie des meilleurs du peloton © Presse Sports
Traditional finish for the Tour de France
42nd finish on the Champs-Élysées
Capital of France
Commune-department and prefecture (75)
2,240,000 inhabitants (Parisiens)

Economy: New technology, research, fashion, luxury goods, tourism (the most visited city in the world, with about 30 million tourists each year)

Culture: 31 monuments (Eiffel Tower, Arc de Triomphe, Notre-Dame Cathedral, Sacré-Coeur, Invalides, Panthéon...), 173 museums (Louvre, Grand and Petit Palais, Pompidou Centre, Orsay, Quai Branly...), three operas, 208 theatres and cabarets, 430 cinema screens. Events: Fashion Week, Solidays (three days of concerts against AIDS), Nuit Blanche (allnight arts' festival), Festival d'Automne (visual and performing arts...)

Sport: Paris Saint-Germain (football, Ligue 1 and women's team), Paris-Levallois (basketball, Pro A), Paris Saint-Germain (handball, Division 1), Stade Français Paris (rugby, Top 14). Events: Paris Marathon and Half-marathon, Internationaux de France de tennis (Roland-Garros Grand Slam tournament), judo (Paris Tournament)

Specialities: French gastronomy, plus de 13,500 brasseries and restaurants

Sustainable development: More than 600km of cycling paths, Vélib' bike hire, Autolib' car hire, tram, metro, railway

Distinction: The backs of the Seine are a UNESCO World Heritage Site

Slogan: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Tossed but not sunk)

Web sites

Places to see

The Eiffel Tower
Originally soaring to a height of 300 metres, but subsequently extended thanks to many antennas to reach 324 metres, the Eiffel Tower was the tallest structure in the world for more than 40 years. A symbol of Paris, it is the most popular paid monument in the world with seven million visitors a year.

Notre-Dame
Upon its completion at the end of the 14th century, it was the largest cathedral in the western world. Construction extended over two centuries on the site of former pagan temples, and it is not uniform in style.

Les Champs-Élysées
Considered by many as the most beautiful avenue in the world, it was created in 1616 by Marie de Medici, who decided to have a long tree-lined driveway constructed through what were then fields. It was extended to L'Étoile to complete its current length in 1724. In 1838, architect Jacques Hittorff designed the buildings on the Champs-Elysées.

La « Dame de Fer » règne sur Paris © Chadi SaadLa célèbre cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-Paris © Gilbert BochenekLa plus belle avenue du monde © Sam Greenhalgh
Traditional finish for the Tour de France
42nd finish on the Champs-Élysées
Capital of France
Commune-department and prefecture (75)
2,240,000 inhabitants (Parisiens)

Economy: New technology, research, fashion, luxury goods, tourism (the most visited city in the world, with about 30 million tourists each year)

Culture: 31 monuments (Eiffel Tower, Arc de Triomphe, Notre-Dame Cathedral, Sacré-Coeur, Invalides, Panthéon...), 173 museums (Louvre, Grand and Petit Palais, Pompidou Centre, Orsay, Quai Branly...), three operas, 208 theatres and cabarets, 430 cinema screens. Events: Fashion Week, Solidays (three days of concerts against AIDS), Nuit Blanche (allnight arts' festival), Festival d'Automne (visual and performing arts...)

Sport: Paris Saint-Germain (football, Ligue 1 and women's team), Paris-Levallois (basketball, Pro A), Paris Saint-Germain (handball, Division 1), Stade Français Paris (rugby, Top 14). Events: Paris Marathon and Half-marathon, Internationaux de France de tennis (Roland-Garros Grand Slam tournament), judo (Paris Tournament)

Specialities: French gastronomy, plus de 13,500 brasseries and restaurants

Sustainable development: More than 600km of cycling paths, Vélib' bike hire, Autolib' car hire, tram, metro, railway

Distinction: The backs of the Seine are a UNESCO World Heritage Site

Slogan: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Tossed but not sunk)

Web sites

Jersey wearers after the stage 2

Classifications after the stage 2

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Sponsorship and Environment

Since it was founded, Amaury Sport Organisation has been involved in various sponsorship and philanthropy activities. It is the generosity of sport that can be found in a certain number of initiatives aiming to invest in the workings of the disciplines themselves (sponsorship of the French Federation of Cycling), in a humanitarian and social framework, (Mécénat Chirurgie Cardiaque, Actions Dakar, Un Techo Para Mi Pais) or in the environmental sphere (Madre De Dios, selective sorting, etc.). Read more

A.S.O. is committed to integrating environmental considerations into the organisation of its races: Limiting CO2 emissions; A quality waste management policy for the spectators but also for the organisers and the riders; The promotion of cycling as an alternative, environmentally-friendly means of transport. Read more

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